Monthly Archives: July, 2007

The weekly Jack Vettriano homage

An Imperfect Past

The official Jack Vettriano website.

Heartbreak Publishing
Heartbreak Publishing – for official limited edition prints, posters cards, gifts, special editions, books and catalogues

All my postings on Jack Vettriano

Ben Verwaayen’s talk at the CISAC Copyright Summit. (Updated 28/03/2008)

Woohoo!

All the Copyright Summit sessions are online.

The cream of the crop is Ben Verwaayen’s Keynote Speech entitled “I’ve seen the future.”

Watch.

Listen.

Admire.

http://www.cisac.org/CisacPortal/CopyRightSummit/video.php?v=3&q=750

No notes, no pre-clearance by legal – all his own words.

Absolute gold!

CISAC Copyright Summit speeches – video:

http://www.cisac.org/CisacPortal/CopyRightSummit/

PS – unfortunately the player can’t be embedded (and I’m not going to rip it and upload it to YouTube/DailyMotion – that may give CISAC a heart attack!) – BUT GO WATCH THIS SPEECH!!!! IT’S BRILLIANT!!! How many CEOs would walk in to a room and simply tell everyone – Your business models are broken, go make new ones! We’re happy to work with you but not do all the work for you!

Much respect!

All my postings on The Copyright Summit

Talking Heads – (Nothing but) Flowers

A tie?

Nicholas Carr has a nice post on a Google drone saying “Men should lose their “business attire”…”

In less than one minute on a Google image search:

Google founders all tied up – Google founders – Larry Page and Sergey Brin.

Original image source

 He does know where he works, doesn’t he?

The weekly Jack Vettriano homage

Dance Me to the End of Love 

The official Jack Vettriano website.

Heartbreak Publishing
Heartbreak Publishing – for official limited edition prints, posters cards, gifts, special editions, books and catalogues

All my postings on Jack Vettriano

Network Administration – This is EXACTLY what it’s like!

The weekly Jack Vettriano homage

Along Came a Spider 

The official Jack Vettriano website.

Heartbreak Publishing
Heartbreak Publishing – for official limited edition prints, posters cards, gifts, special editions, books and catalogues

All my postings on Jack Vettriano

The new weekly Jack Vettriano homage

Just Another Day

The official Jack Vettriano website.

Heartbreak Publishing
Heartbreak Publishing – for official limited edition prints, posters cards, gifts, special editions, books and catalogues

All my postings on Jack Vettriano

Ashley Highfield on DRM and the BBC iPlayer – Redux.

Found via a link Jem Stone posted on this Guardian blog.

Keynote speech given at IEA Future Of Broadcasting Conference.

“Our BBC iPlayer service, launching on 27 July, offering the last seven days of the BBC’s TV programmes on–demand over the internet, has already helped all the players in the UK on–demand space. We established the rights frameworks with the relevant rights bodies such as PACT. We established the technology framework that enabled us to use a peer–to–peer service that kept our distribution costs down whilst keeping our rights holders happy, a framework that has been copied by both Sky and Channel 4. And by working closely with the internet service providers like Carphone Warehouse and Virgin Media, we believe the BBC iPlayer will drive new broadband take–up, and demand for higher connection speeds. Market impact? Yes – a positive one!

BBC iPlayer is a service for everyone in the UK. The BBC earns over £500m from the international exploitation of its content, every penny of which goes back into making better programmes for the British public. We therefore needed to ensure, through the use of digital rights management, DRM, that our programmes could be viewed, in high quality, in the UK, for free, but not get instantly distributed around the world and undermine our international licensing and syndication deals.

DRM is not popular, but having it means the difference between being able to afford to make Blue Planet or not. Protecting our content is not optional anyway. A third of our content is made by independent producers who insist we protect our content as their future depends on exploiting that content themselves outside our rights window.”

Very pleasant lunch in Paris yesterday.

Met up with Benjamin Bejbaum, from DailyMotion, in Paris yesterday for lunch.

 They are doing some amazing things and some pretty interesting stuff on the horizon.

Very funny guy! Very enjoyable lunch!

Battersea Power Station from the train.

Battersea Power Station

Very funny leader in The Guardian.

See: http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/story/0,,2118862,00.html

Performing music is fairly simple – a matter of arranging player, instrument and venue. Until, that is, you get to the small print. What could be more basic than a rousing public chorus of Happy Birthday? Apart from the fact that doing so is a breach of copyright law (which is why films hardly ever show it). What could be simpler than defining incidental music? Even addled revellers know what it is, music which is not the central focus: a restaurant featuring a piano accompanist, say, or a fete with a band providing impromptu entertainment. Yet as the government’s live music forum reported yesterday, harmless, possibly even pleasurable, performances are not going ahead because of heavy-handed application of vague licensing law.

A West Country male choir has been condemned to silence because some local-authority jobsworth deemed entertaining pedestrians (and fundraising for charity) to count as a fully fledged concert. The choristers are not alone: didgeridoo players, brass bands and folk societies across the UK have all been stifled because local officials were not satisfied they were only providing small-scale, incidental entertainment. This is surely not what the government intended when it streamlined the licensing law in 2003. The new culture secretary (and music fan) James Purnell can easily right the situation with an amendment defining incidental music. He should do so. There may be reasons to silence didgeridoos, but poorly framed regulation should not be one of them.

Ashley Highfield on DRM and the BBC iPlayer.

BBC Technology News webpage with embedded video interview of Ashley Highfield, Director Future Media and Technology, BBC.

Stand-alone version of the video interview of Ashley Highfield, Director Future Media and Technology, BBC.

Quote:

The Open Source Consortia (sic) have already made their case to the Trust and to Ofcom, who have said there is no case to answer. I’m more than happy to engage with the OSC in meaningful debate but as they themselves said, in an ideal world the BBC wouldn’t have DRM, Digital Rights Management, on it’s programmes.

We don’t live in an ideal world. We simply wouldn’t be able to offer the iPlayer unless our rights holders were happy that we were protecting their content.”